23 4 / 2014

thelovelyseas:

An all-black Commerson’s (or giant) frogfish, Antennarius commersonimoving from one piling to another, beneath a jetty. Frogfish are poor swimmers, and may use a combination of tail flapping from side to side and “jet propulsion” (shooting swallowed water out backward through their narrow gill openings) to move slowly through the water. (Ambon, Indonesia) by David Hall

thelovelyseas:

An all-black Commerson’s (or giant) frogfish, Antennarius commersonimoving from one piling to another, beneath a jetty. Frogfish are poor swimmers, and may use a combination of tail flapping from side to side and “jet propulsion” (shooting swallowed water out backward through their narrow gill openings) to move slowly through the water. (Ambon, Indonesia) by David Hall

22 4 / 2014

libutron:

Cocoa Damselfish | ©Seth Patterson
 Stegastes variabiliis (Perciformes - Pomacentridae) is one of the most common reef fish found along the Gulf Coast of South Texas. This particular juvenile was photographed during a scuba diving trip to the Texas Clipper. As they mature their bright blues and yellows are replaced by bland grays and browns.
Cocoa damselfish occurs in Western Atlantic: Florida (USA), Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea to Brazil [source].

libutron:

Cocoa Damselfish | ©Seth Patterson

Stegastes variabiliis (Perciformes - Pomacentridae) is one of the most common reef fish found along the Gulf Coast of South Texas. This particular juvenile was photographed during a scuba diving trip to the Texas Clipper. As they mature their bright blues and yellows are replaced by bland grays and browns.

Cocoa damselfish occurs in Western Atlantic: Florida (USA), Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea to Brazil [source].

(via ichthyologist)

21 4 / 2014

rhamphotheca:

Steppe Eagle - Greater Rann of Kutch

itsmeritesh:

While driving toward a particular rocky hill in the Greater Rann of Kutch, we saw this magnificent raptor sitting right on top. The Steppe Eagle (Aquila nipalensis) is a big bird, about  60 to 80 cms in size, and is hard to miss. These raptors are migratory birds who spend their summers in the Steppes and then head south for winter. The ones that reside in the Mongolian and Russian region, migrate to India during the winter, crossing the mighty Himalayas in their journey. It generally prefers dry desert like surroundings and its diet consists mainly of small mammals and birds. 

Birdlife states that their population is decreasing and puts estimates of around 1 bird per 100 sq km radius. The best place to sight them is in their migratory path, where they form flocks of hundreds while crossing tricky terrain or feeding sites. 

image

13 4 / 2014

fairy-wren:

Guianan Cock of the Rock. Photo by Ricardo Gentil

fairy-wren:

Guianan Cock of the Rock. Photo by Ricardo Gentil

(via legendofliz)

12 4 / 2014

zooborns:

Baby Bactrian Camel Takes His First Steps at Cincinnati Zoo

A Bactrian Camel born on February 25 is already winning fans at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden. Keepers announced the male baby’s name, Jack, one week and one day after his birth – on Hump Day, of course.

See the adorable video at Zooborns.

(via dottily)

08 4 / 2014

rhamphotheca:

Keepers at Paignton Zoo have stepped in to hand-raise a Pygmy Slow Loris baby that was neglected by its mother.

Dedicated keepers at Paignton Zoo in England are caring for a rare baby that weighed little more than a CD at birth.

The Pygmy Slow Loris – which weighed just 22 grams when it was born - was one of twins born to a first-time mother. One twin did not survive, and keepers stepped in to save the other when its mother abandoned it.

For the first night Head Mammal Keeper Craig Gilchrist slept in an office at the zoo, feeding the tiny youngster every couple of hours. It was given a milk replacer using a 1 milliliter syringe and a small rubber teat…

Read more: Zooborns

07 4 / 2014

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms
by Mary Bates
Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.
Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.
They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.
1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…
(read more: Wired Science)
photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms

by Mary Bates

Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.

Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.

They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.

1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…

(read more: Wired Science)

photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

04 4 / 2014

rhamphotheca:

The Greater Short-horned Lizard, Phrynosoma (douglasii) hernandesi, a beautiful, live-bearing taxon, ranges southward from southern Saskatchewan to far south in Mexico. It occurs ion a wide variety of habitats including open woodland areas of the Guadalupe Mountains (as shown here).
(photo/text: Dick Bartlett)

rhamphotheca:

The Greater Short-horned Lizard, Phrynosoma (douglasii) hernandesi, a beautiful, live-bearing taxon, ranges southward from southern Saskatchewan to far south in Mexico. It occurs ion a wide variety of habitats including open woodland areas of the Guadalupe Mountains (as shown here).

(photo/text: Dick Bartlett)

(via somuchscience)

03 4 / 2014

stuckinabucket:

The majority of geckos lack eyelids.  They have a transparent membrane over their eyes that keeps them moist and offers a certain amount of protection, but they still need a way to clean them off every so often.  Above: A demonstration of the way they clean them off every so often.

Some species, like Lialis burtonis, have additional adaptations that let them keep their eyes out of harm’s way.

The exception to the “geckos don’t have eyelids” rule would be the family Eublepharidae, which has about thirty species, lacks sticky toe-pads, and seems to like hanging out in deserts.

Of course, just because they can do this:

does not necessarily mean that they don’t also do this:

Because geckos.

(via somuchscience)

02 4 / 2014

4quarius:

Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus)

Unlike the Indian peafowl, which most people are familiar with, the male and female green peafowl have similar coloration. Green peafowl have green, rather than blue, feathers on the head and neck. This endangered species has a very rapidly declining and severely fragmented population, primarily owing to intense habitat conversion and high hunting levels. 

Photo sources: Sasi - smit and James Buckley